The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
    Stonehill College
   
 
  Nov 22, 2017
 
2016-2017 HillBook (Class of 2020) 
  
2016-2017 HillBook (Class of 2020)

ENG 100/135 - American Women Writers (Core/First-Year Seminar)

Three or Four Credits
Not Offered 2016-2017

In this course, we will read poetry, drama, and fiction written by American women during the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries. We will consider how gender identity is constructed by, and interacts with, race, class, history, geography, politics, and socio-economic realities in our country in an attempt to arrive at an understanding of a vision (or visions) American women writers seek to articulate and how this understanding of our culture(s) and lives helps inform and enhance American literature as a whole. In what ways do the social, political, and historical context that women have written from and the range of racial and class barriers they face inform the content or style of these works? How have these writers been categorized and evaluated based on gender? For that matter, how important is the identity of the author to the work in question? Are women’s lives of universal importance to readers of both genders or do we risk ghetto-izing work written by women by identifying it as such? Be prepared to share your ideas and opinions, to think and reflect about what these writers and your peers say, and to respond thoughtfully.

Prerequisite(s): ENG 135 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
When offered as ENG 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement.
When offered as ENG 135, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and
Literature Cornerstone Requirements.