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2016-2017 HillBook (Class of 2020)
Stonehill College
   
 
  Dec 16, 2017
 
2016-2017 HillBook (Class of 2020) 
  
2016-2017 HillBook (Class of 2020)

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

American Studies

  
  •  

    AMS 100/112 - Native Voices in American Culture (LIT Core/First-Year Seminar)

    Three or Four Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    More than Mascots! In this course we will analyze fiction, memoire, mainstream and independent film, folklore, photography, and popular culture artifacts to explore the role the American Indian has played in the American imagination and how Native artists and activists have responded to these images. Students will use methods from American Studies, and cultural and literary studies in understanding the complex shaping of cultural identity.

    Prerequisite(s): AMS 112 is a First-Year Seminar and open to First-Year Students only.
    When offered as AMS 100, for 3-credits, fulfills the Literature Cornerstone Requirement.
    When offered as AMS 112, for 4-credits, fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Literature Cornerstone Requirements.

     

  
  •  

    AMS 110 - Women Reimagining History (LIT Core/First-Year Seminar)

    Four Credits
    Not Offered 2015-2016

    In this course we will look at how women and in particular women of color writers and filmmakers have challenged and complicated our understanding of U.S. history, culture, and politics in the 20th century. In the context of immigration, slavery, and the lives of Native Americans, we will analyze what these stories of self and community tell us about how important race and gender are to our understanding of the past. Likely texts/films include: Maxine Hong Kingston’s Woman Warrior, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Louise Erdrich’s Tracks, Lourdes Portillo’s Señorita Extraviada (film), and Ursula Biemann’s Performing the Border (film).

    Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year students only.
    Fulfills the First-Year Seminar and Cornerstone Literature Requirements.

    Course may be applied to the Gender &  Sexuality Studies program.

     

  
  •  

    AMS 200 - Introduction to American Studies

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    Introduction to the study of America from an interdisciplinary perspective, emphasizing critical analysis of culture though exploration of a wide range of cultural artifacts including literary and historical texts, visual images and material objects. Developing a critical understanding of such key concepts as race, gender, class, sexuality, citizenship, the border, empire, and nation, students will examine the many aspects of thought, expression, and behavior that have shaped and defined the complex society of the United States. In addition to studying the diverse cultural experiences and meanings that shape individual and collective notions of American identity, students will also explore self-reflexively their own relationship to America’s diverse history and culture.

  
  •  

    AMS 290 - The Italian American Experience

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    The course examines the experience of immigration and acculturation of the Italian American community through historical data, literary works and cinematographic representations. The class is conducted in English. All primary and secondary works are in English or in English translation.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of the First-Year Seminar requirement.
    Course may be applied to the Italian Studies program.
  
  •  

    AMS 320 - Topics in American Studies

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2014-2015

    Offers the opportunity to study a specific issue or topic in American Studies in greater depth. Seminar format focuses on classroom discussions and research. Topic will be announced prior to registration.

    May be taken more than once if topics differ.
  
  •  

    AMS 420 - Seminar in American Studies

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    Provides research tools, strategies, and guidance for the elaboration of a significant research project in an area of American cultural studies with emphasis on the collaborative selection and research of issues for discussion as well as on sharing the process of project development. The specific content of this course varies with the instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing
  
  •  

    AMS 475 - Internship in American Studies

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Practical experience in a local organization such as a government office, museum, arts agency, or social action group. Allows students to translate American Studies theory and method into professional skills and opportunities.

    Must complete the “U.S. Internship Request for Approval” process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.
  
  •  

    AMS 490 - Directed Study

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    An in-depth interdisciplinary study of a question under the tutorial direction of a faculty member.


Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANT 105 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    This course is an introduction to cultural anthropology and is designed as an exploration into the diversity of ways in which human beings perceive and order the social world. Topics covered include kinship, gender, language, ecology, economy, political organization, globalization, religion and worldview from a diverse array of cultural viewpoints. Course readings and films include both classic and contemporary ethnographies.

    This course was formerly offered as SOC 228 Cultural Anthropology.

    Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

    Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors.
    Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.
     

  
  •  

    ANT 110 - Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective (First-Year Seminar)

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    This course examines concepts of marriage and family as social institutions from a cross-cultural perspective.  Drawing on both classic and contemporary essays as well as in-depth ethnographic studies of families, we will examine the ways in which intimate relationships are created, understood, and enacted around the globe.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
    This course was formerly numbered SOC 230 and is the equivalent to ANT 230 - Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective   

    Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement and may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.

  
  •  

    ANT 200 - Foundations of Archeology

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Archaeology is the study of the human past through the remains of their material culture. Archaeologists study artifacts, sites, settlements, and landscapes to gain an understanding of how humans lived in the distant and recent past. Students will gain an understanding of the principles, methods, and theories of archaeological research, while exploring the history of the field and case studies.

    This course was formerly offered as SOC 115 Introduction to Archeology.

    Fulfills the Social Scientific Inquiry requirement.

  
  •  

    ANT 230 - Families in Cross-Cultural Perspective

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    This course examines concepts of marriage and family as social institutions from a cross-cultural perspective.  Drawing on both classic and contemporary essays as well as in-depth ethnographic studies of families, we will examine the ways in which intimate relationships are created, understood, and enacted around the globe.

    This course was formerly SOC 230 Families in Cross-Cultural Perspectives.

    Course may be applied to the Gender & Sexuality Studies program.
     

  
  •  

    ANT 233 - Language and Culture

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    This course is an overview of linguistic anthropology and sociolinguists, focusing on the relationship between language, culture, and society.  Students will explore the nature of human language by studying language in a variety of social contexts with the goal of better understanding how language and culture interact to reflect, maintain, alter, and create the social worlds in which we live. 

    This course formerly offered as SOC 233 Language and Culture.

    Course may be applied to the Asian Studies and Middle Eastern Studies minors.
    Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program with permission of the Program Director.

     

  
  •  

    ANT 304 - Museum Studies

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    A survey of museology, this course introduces students to the history of museums and debates about their role in society.  Students will visit and read case studies of ethnographic, history, and art museums among others to explore the relationships between exhibits, museum missions, those they represent, and the communities in which they reside. 

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101  or ANT 105 .
    This course was formerly offered as SOC 304 Introduction to Museum Studies.

    Course may be applied to the American Studies program.

     

  
  •  

    ANT 315 - Latin American People and Cultures

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    This course involves an in-depth exploration of Latin American and Caribbean culture, both historically and today. We will be investigating the interdependence between economically developed and lesser developed parts of the Latin America, the Caribbean, and other regions of the world. Students will be presented with an anthropological perspective on a range of issues related to the region, using primary cultural documents and ethnographic works to more deeply understand specific Latin American populations.

    Course may be applied to the Latin American Studies program.
  
  •  

    ANT 316 - People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Students will explore the culture of contemporary Russia and East Europe from an anthropological perspective using ethnographic research to explore how the socialist past continues to shape contemporary society in the region.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 105  or SOC 101 .
    This course was formerly offered as SOC 316 People & Cultures of Russia & East Europe.
  
  •  

    ANT 328 - Illness and Society

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    An introduction to Medical Anthropology, this course involves an exploration of the social factors that influence the distribution and treatment of illness in society. The class will also include a critical examination of the U.S. health care system and the evolution of the doctor-patient relationship in our society. Students will be presented with cross-cultural views on a variety of health problems through scholarly articles and ethnographies.

  
  •  

    ANT 329 - Anthropology of Violence

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    War, political and economic oppression, sectarian strife, poverty and disease are pervasive in the world today, ravaging the lives of ever-growing numbers of people. Using a cross-cultural approach, we will explore the impact of violence on society, its cultural legacies, and examples of building peace.

    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101  or ANT 105 .
    This course was formerly offered as SOC 329 Anthropology of Violence.
  
  •  

    ANT 334 - Anthropology of the Holocaust

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    In recent decades social scientists have increasingly turned their attention to the Holocaust. The goal of this class is to examine these studies in order to better understand the events, their causes, and their legacies from a range of perspectives: victims, perpetrators, witnesses, and rescuers.

  
  •  

    ANT 350 - Topics in Anthropology

    Three Credits
    Offered Periodically

    Examines a topic of current interest in the public sphere from an anthropological perspective. The content and format of the course will be tailored to the topic area.

    Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.
  
  •  

    ANT 497 - Anthropology Senior Thesis

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Fourth-year students will polish their communication skills and build on prior coursework in the development of a thesis. The goal is preparation of a paper suitable for presentation at an annual meeting of a professional association or a writing sample for graduate school.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 105 or SOC 228, SOC 312
    Permission of the Instructor and Program Director.

Applied Learning

  
  •  

    APL 001 - First-Year Experience

    Zero Credits
    Fall Semester

    First-Year Experience will introduce First-year students to higher education (e.g., how is college different from high school) and will assist them in better understanding their role in the educational experience offered by Stonehill. Through active engagement in the class and its requirements, First-year students will become more familiar with the expectations and responsibilities that come with being a Stonehill student.

     

  
  •  

    APL 002 - New Transfer Experience

    Zero Credits
    Fall Semester

    The New Transfer Experience will introduce new transfer students to the educational experience offered by Stonehill. Through active engagement in the class and its requirements, New transfer students will become more familiar with the expectations and responsibilities that come with being a Stonehill student.

    Open to new transfer students only.
  
  •  

    APL 041 - Academic Community Experience (ACE) Learning Theory

    One Credit
    Summer

    APL 041 is an introductory study skills class for First-Year students enrolled in the Academic Community Experience Program. The course will provide an overview of strategies to improve attention, memory and  motivation. Specific strategies and technologies that support skill development in reading, writing, memory and organization will be reviewed. Students will learn ways to become more strategic in their approach to coursework and then apply these strategies during lectures, in-class discussions and academic assignments.    

    Prerequisite(s): This course is by invitation only.
  
  •  

    APL 042 - Applications of Learning Theory

    One Credit
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Study skills class for first year students. Cornell system of note-taking taught along with individual learning style assessment, exam strategies and SQ3R method of text book reading. Learn how to break up large tasks and complex ideas into small understandable parts. Strategies have shown to produce significant improvements in GPA.

  
  •  

    APL 045 - Math Basics for Scientists and Engineers

    One Credit
    Wintersession

    This course will be a survey of mathematical concepts for science and engineering students. There will be no homework given and no exams. Learning will be facilitated via problem solving during class. Some possible topics (not all may be covered due to time limitations) include: algebra, trig. functions, the complex plane, polar coordinates, spherical coordinates, cylindrical coordinates, series, logs, derivatives, integration and statistics.

    There is no textbook needed for this course. You will be given credit for attending the course. Course will be graded as pass/fail.
  
  •  

    APL 075 - Life after Stonehill: Preparing for a Fulfilling Career

    One Credit
    Fall and Spring Semester

    Graduating from college is an anxious and confusing time for students. This one credit course is offered to sophomores, juniors and seniors who want to actively engage in bridging who they are and what they have learned with their short and long-term career goals. Topics include assessment of self, exploration of career paths, basic budgeting, the art of negotiation and others.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to sophomores, juniors and seniors.

     
    Course may not be repeated.

  
  •  

    APL 095 - Graduate Record Exam Prep

    Zero Credits
    Fall Semester

    Many graduate schools require the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for admission. Requirements and scores vary between programs. Your intention should be to take the test once, which requires that you prepare adequately. This course will provide study tips, sample test questions and practice exams in an effort to help you achieve your best score.

    Students enrolled in this review course will be billed an additional $200 on their semester tuition bill.
  
  •  

    APL 201 - Professional Readiness Certificate

    One Credit
    Spring Semester

    What is the value of your liberal arts education? What will you do with your major? What steps should you be taking now to ensure your professional readiness after graduation? This course will examine each of these questions and help you align your major to skills and career readiness competencies in demand by employers today.

    Not Open to the Class of 2017
  
  •  

    APL 300 - Post-Graduate Preparation Seminar - Law School I

    One Credit
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Students will learn methods for answering each of the LSAT question types as they appear on the LSAT. Test-taking strategies to maximize your strengths and minimize your weaknesses will be emphasized. The course begins with a full-length, three-hour pre-test which will be corrected and discussed during the second class. Mandatory homework will be taken from released LSATs and will support principles taught in class. Classes during the first session meet twice a week on Sunday and Wednesday, for four hours per session, for the first month of the Fall Semester and the last month and ½ of the spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior Standing.
    Students enrolled in this one credit course will be billed an additional $300 on their semester tuition bills.
  
  •  

    APL 301 - Post-Graduate Preparation Seminar - Law School II

    One Credit
    Fall Semester

    Students will hear from law school admission officers, the pre-law advisor and other Stonehill Faculty, and will discuss strategies for applying to law school, the personal statement, develop a list of criteria important to the student, and a list of potential law schools. Law School II will meet from October to December in the Fall Semester only.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of the Pre-Law Advisor.
  
  •  

    APL 305 - Discernment & Communication

    One Credit
    Spring Semester

    By the end of the course each student will be a stronger applicant for research opportunities, internships, national awards and fellowships, graduate school, post-graduate service programs, and employment.  Throughout the course students will use the Think. Act. Lead. model of thoughtful and intentional self-assessment and reflection through journaling, written assignments, and group discussion, to identify and articulate their academic, professional, and personal interests, strengths and goals.  A specific emphasis will be placed on the development of written and oral communication skills through a series of thoughtful and self-reflective activities that will yield constructive criticism from peers and faculty.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore or Junior standing, cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher, and permission of instructor
    This course is graded Pass/Fail.
  
  •  

    APL 310 - G.R.A.S.P.: Preparing for Your Journey

    One Credit
    Fall Semesters

    This course is designed to assist students in preparing for their study abroad experience, enabling them to gain a deeper perspective on their expectations of and motivations for studying abroad. The course will facilitate enhanced cultural awareness of self and other, promoting an immersive and transformative overseas experience.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of Assistant Director of International Programs.
  
  •  

    APL 311 - G.R.A.S.P.: Reflections from Abroad

    One Credit
    Fall Semesters

    This course is designed to maximize cultural learning, self-reflection, and immersion in the host community while participating in a study abroad program. Conceptually, it builds upon APL310, promoting a deeper understanding of the cultural self and a richer appreciation for a diverse global community.

    Prerequisite(s):   .
  
  •  

    APL 312 - G.R.A.S.P.: A Thoughtful Return

    One Credit
    Fall Semesters

    This course is designed to assist students in reentry to their home environments following their study abroad program and to address the questions of “what just happened?” and “now what?”. Students will identify, process, and integrate their newly acquired cultural selves, learning how to incorporate what they have learned into future life experiences.

    Prerequisite(s):   and  .
  
  •  

    APL 475 - Internship in Career Planning

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    The Career Planning Program trains interns to assist first-year students in the career decision-making process by: Providing an informational overview of the Career Planning Program, interviewing students, interpreting the Strong Interest Inventory, and suggesting resources to students. Interns have the opportunity to sharpen writing skills through weekly reports of interview sessions. This internship is designed to assist third- and fourth-year students in developing professional work habits, as well as strengthening communication, interpersonal, and organizational skills.

    Must complete the “U.S. Internship Request for Approval” process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship. This internship may also be taken as PSY 475 - Internship in Applied Psychology I .

Arabic

  
  •  

    ARB 131 - Elementary Arabic I

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    This is the first course in a two-semester sequence introducing students to Modern Standard Arabic. By completing both semesters, students will reach the “novice high” proficiency level as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages, in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competence.

    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 132 - Elementary Arabic II

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    This course is a continuation of  .

    Prerequisite(s): ARB 131 .
    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 231 - Intermediate Arabic I

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    This is the first course of the two-semester sequence in Modern Standard Arabic at the Intermediate level. By completing both semesters, students will reach the “Intermediate Mid-Level” in speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.
     

    Prerequisite(s):   or equivalent.
    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 232 - Intermediate Arabic II

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    This course is continuation of  .

    Prerequisite(s):  .
    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 331 - Advanced Arabic I

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    In both semesters of Advanced Arabic, students build upon their previous knowledge and develop the ability to: speak simple dialogue of paragraph length; understand more authentic speech; write a series of coherent paragraphs; read authentic text to acquire information. The course integrates history and culture, as well as contemporary events and issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ARB 232  or equivalent.
    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 332 - Advanced Arabic II

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    In both semesters of Advanced Arabic, students build upon their previous knowledge and develop the ability to: speak simple dialogue of paragraph length; understand more authentic speech; write a series of coherent paragraphs; read authentic text to acquire information. The course integrates history and culture, as well as contemporary events and issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ARB 331   or equivalent
    Course may be applied to the Middle Eastern Studies minor.
  
  •  

    ARB 490 - Directed Study: Topics in Arabic

    One to Four Credits
    As Needed

    Opportunity for upper-level students to do an advanced research project or investigation in an Arabic field of special interest not covered by a normally-scheduled course. The student and a full-time faculty member familiar with the student’s area of interest agree on a plan of study and research and on evaluation methods.

    Prerequisite(s): Students must complete the online Directed Study and Independent Research Application process and obtain the signatures of the faculty member and the Department Chair.

Art History

  
  •  

    VPH 111 - Boston Buildings: Inside and Out (First-Year Seminar)

    Four Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Boston is home to many exquisite private urban dwellings: Paul Revere House, the Harrison Grey Otis House, the Gibson House, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and Gropius House. In addition, Boston boasts some of the most cutting edge public buildings such as the Boston Public Library, Trinity Church, and Boston City Hall. This course will introduce students to Boston’s private living spaces and how they reflect the people who lived in them and its historic public buildings that reflect the city who commissioned them. On site visits, guest curators and critical readings will all contribute to a new understanding of Boston architecture.

    Prerequisite(s): Open to First-Year Students only.
    Fulfills the First-Year Seminar Requirement.
  
  •  

    VPH 181 - History of Art I (History Cornerstone) (WID)

    Four Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    This one-semester survey explores major developments in art and architecture from Antiquity through the 19th Century, considering historical events and ideological shifts which contributed to the stylistic changes. Trips to Boston museums enhance class content.

    Fulfills the History Cornerstone and the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirements.
  
  •  

    VPH 184 - Introduction to Arts Administration

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester


    The course will introduce students to the many facets of arts administration in the visual and performing arts. Topics to be investigated will include: the role of arts in society; management strategies; funding venues; and legal and ethical issues in the arts.
     

    Course may be applied to the American Studies program.
  
  •  

    VPH 209 - History of Photography

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    History of Photography is a general survey of photographic practice from 1839 to the present. Through lectures, exhibition viewings, class discussion and student-led presentations, students will explore the aesthetic, social and conceptual underpinnings of the medium throughout the last 170 years.

  
  •  

    VPH 210 - Writing for the Arts (WID)

    Three Credits
    Spring Semesters

    Being an artist or a professional working within the arts requires the ability to float between the role of creator, manager, publicist and editor. This class will address the writing of resumes, grants, fundraising drives, performance programs and more. There will be regular workshops and critiques of your work.

    Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement.
  
  •  

    VPH 212 - Aesthetics

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    For description, see PHL 283 .

    Prerequisite(s): One 100-Level Philosophy Course
    Cross-listed in Philosophy with  .
  
  •  

    VPH 214 - The Age of Cathedrals

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    Examines the rise of the Gothic Cathedral from its roots in the Ottonian and Romanesque periods. Great European Cathedrals like Chartres, Notre Dame, Strasbourg, Salisbury, are discussed in detail.

    Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.
  
  •  

    VPH 215 - Early Renaissance Art: Italy and the North

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Introduction to the art of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in Italy and the North. Students explore different types of art such as altarpieces, civic art, and court art. Artistic exchanges between Italy and the North are examined, and the role that patrons, the economy, and the military played are investigated.

    Fulfills the Catholic Intellectual Traditions requirement.
  
  •  

    VPH 217 - Early Modern Art: 1900-1945

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Some of the most profound innovations in art occurred during the first half of the Twentieth Century. In this course, students study major developments including Fauvism, German Expressionism, Cubism, Dada and Surrealism in terms of style and theory and within cultural, social and political contexts. A trip to the Museum of Modern Art in New York City enriches classroom curriculum.

  
  •  

    VPH 218 - Art Since 1945

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Major movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Super Realism, Neo-Expressionism as well as works which go beyond traditional media (earthworks, video art, performance art, digital imaging). Day trips to museums and galleries complement class material.

    Course may be applied to the American Studies program.
  
  •  

    VPH 220 - From Bernini to Vermeer: Art of the Baroque

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Survey of the visual arts in Italy, France, Spain, Flanders, and Holland during the Seventeenth Century. Students consider some of the world’s most evocative and emotionally stirring art that was shaped by the demands of monarchs and popes. Also explored are cultural, religious, and scientific factors which influenced changes in artistic style and technique.

  
  •  

    VPH 227 - Modern American Architecture

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    This course examines twentieth and twenty-first century architecture in America and its European roots. Through classroom instruction via digital images, readings and field trips, students will focus on issues such as function, style, technology, urbanism, and regionalism in order to understand the forces that shape modern architecture.

  
  •  

    VPH 229 - Topics in Non-Western Art

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Examines the traditional and contemporary arts of various non-western cultures, focusing on a particular culture each time the course is offered. Specific cultures to be studied include: Indian, Chinese, Japanese, African, and Native American.

  
  •  

    VPH 230 - Art and Psychology: Introduction to Art Therapy

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    Addresses the relationship between works of art and scientific inquiry into the human mind.  Students will be introduced to the history and theory of Art Therapy and investigate the creative process and its relationship to therapy.  Readings, films, and experiential workshops will all be part of the course. 

    No artistic experience necessary.
  
  •  

    VPH 314 - Masters of the Renaissance: Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    An in-depth study of the works of these three High Renaissance artists, the evolution of their respective styles, and the environment in which they worked. Specific scholarly issues are discussed in student presentations.

  
  •  

    VPH 330 - Topics in European or American Art

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Investigates focused topics in American art and culture from the Colonial period to the present. The topic will change each time the course is offered. Possible areas to be explored include: The “Other” in America; Jazz Age and Depression Art and Culture; Modernist/ Postmodernist Architecture. Recommended for Art History and American Studies concentrators.

    Course may be taken twice as long as topics differ.
    Course may be applied to the American Studies program.
  
  •  

    VPH 332 - Museums: Past and Present

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    This course explores the history, philosophy, and evolving practices of museum and exhibition culture. Students will study current approaches and strategies of exhibition, collection, and educational programming.  Visits to regional museums and galleries will enhance class material.

  
  •  

    VPH 440 - Exhibitions and Collections: An Inside Look

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    An inside look at the art world. Visits to art galleries, museums, auction houses, and corporate and private collections introduce students to a variety of art institutions and professions. Students curate an exhibition at the Cushing-Martin Gallery: they visit artists’ studios to choose work; organize the exhibition; hang work in the gallery; write a catalogue and press releases; and plan a reception. 

    Capstone course for Art History Concentration.
  
  •  

    VPH 441 - Research Seminar in Art History

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2016-2017

    Examines specific topics in Western art, applying art historical methodology and critical approaches to in-depth research with primary and secondary sources. Topic will change each time the seminar is offered. Students will produce an extensive research paper and give an oral presentation. Strongly suggested for Art History majors and minors.

    Prerequisite(s): VPH 181  plus one 200 level and one 300 level art history courses.
  
  •  

    VPH 475 - Internship in Fine Arts

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    An internship in a professional arts institution provides students with invaluable experience in the field. An intern typically works 8-10 hours per week on site. Internships are available at various galleries, museums and companies.

    Must complete the “U.S. Internship Request for Approval” process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.

Arts Administration

  
  
  •  

    VPN 490 - Directed Study

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Opportunity for upper-level students to do an advanced research project or investigation in a field of special interest not covered by a normally-scheduled course. Student and a full-time faculty member familiar with the student’s area of interest agree on a plan of study and research and on evaluation methods. Up to 3 credits of directed study may fulfill appropriate slot in major requirements. 

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of both the faculty member directing the project and the Department Chairperson required.

Biochemistry

  
  •  

    BCH 343 - Biochemistry I

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    Structure and dynamics of amino acids, peptides and proteins. Enzyme mechanisms and kinetics. Function and mechanisms of coenzymes, survey of carbohydrates, lipids, biological membranes and nucleic acids. An introduction to the bioenergetics and mechanisms of metabolism.

    Corequisite(s): CHM 222 .
  
  •  

    BCH 344 - Biochemistry II

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    A comprehensive examination of metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids.

    Prerequisite(s): BCH 343 .
  
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    BCH 345 - Biochemistry Laboratory (WID)

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    The course applies both classical and modern biochemical techniques to the characterization of amino acids, the purification of proteins, the analysis of enzyme kinetics, and the study of DNA denaturation.

    Prerequisite(s): BCH 343 .
    Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement.
  
  •  

    BCH 446 - Advanced Topics in Biochemistry

    Three Credits
    Offered Periodically

    This course provides in-depth coverage of up-to-date advanced biochemical topics. This course is an advanced biochemistry elective for all science majors. The specific content focuses on important and ubiquitous topics in biochemistry and incorporates in-depth study of recently published literature.

    Prerequisite(s):   .
  
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    BCH 447 - Junior Fall Biochemistry Seminar

    Zero Credits
    Fall Semester

    Third-year Biochemistry majors meet with Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty once a week for both internal and external seminars. Each student is required to prepare and present a half-hour seminar on a topic of his/her choice found in a current professional journal. All students are expected to attend and provide professional evaluations of other students’ seminar presentations.

     

    Prerequisite(s): Junior Biochemistry majors only.
    Students will earn four credits in the second semester senior year upon successful completion of BCH 447,  ,  , and   .
  
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    BCH 448 - Junior Spring Biochemistry Seminar

    Zero Credits
    Spring Semester

    Third-year Biochemistry majors meet with Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty once a week for both internal and external seminars. All students are expected to attend and provide professional evaluations of other students’ seminar presentations.

    Prerequisite(s):  .
    Students will earn four credits in the second semester senior year upon successful completion of  , BCH 448,  , and   .
  
  •  

    BCH 449 - Senior Fall Biochemistry Seminar

    Zero Credits
    Fall Semester

    Fourth-year Biochemistry majors meet with Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty once a week for both internal and external seminar presentations. During the fall semester of the fourth year each student is required to prepare and present a half-hour seminar on a topic of his/her choice found in a current professional journal. All students are expected to attend and provide professional evaluations of other students’ seminar presentations. During the fall semester, each fourth-year student will be expected to start writing a thesis. Preferably this thesis will cover experimental or theoretical research the student has actually done.

    Prerequisite(s):  .
    Students will earn four credits in the second semester senior year upon successful completion of  ,  , BCH 449 and  .
  
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    BCH 450 - Senior Spring Biochemistry Seminar & Thesis

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    Fourth-year Biochemistry majors meet with Chemistry and Biochemistry faculty once a week for both internal and external seminar presentations. All students are expected to attend and provide professional evaluations of other students’ seminar presentations. Each fourth-year student will be expected to write and defend his/her thesis in the spring semester of the fourth year.

    Prerequisite(s):  .
    Students will earn four credits in the second semester senior year upon successful completion of  ,  ,  , and BCH 450.
  
  •  

    BCH 475 - Internship in Biochemistry

    Three to Fifteen Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Opportunity to obtain research or practical experience in biochemistry at an industrial, government, hospital or university setting. Approval of the site supervisor and the Director of the Biochemistry Program required.

    Must complete the “U.S. Internship Request for Approval” process found under the myPlans tab in myHill to register for this Internship.
  
  •  

    BCH 490 - Directed Study

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Investigation in some field for which the student has special interest not covered by a normally-scheduled course. Student must present plans in advance of pre-registration to some full-time faculty member who will agree to direct and evaluate the project.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the faculty member directing the project and the Director of the Biochemistry Program required.
  
  •  

    BCH 496 - Independent Research

    One to Four Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Opportunity for students to do an advanced research project in a specialized area under the direction of a member of the Biochemistry faculty.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the faculty member directing the project and the Director of the Biochemistry Program required.
    BCH 496 must be taken for three credits to count as a course towards the major.
  
  •  

    BCH 497 - Biochemistry Senior Thesis

    Three Credits
    Fall and Spring Semesters

    Students complete an advanced research project in a specialized area under the direction of a Biology or Chemistry faculty member, resulting in a senior thesis. This course will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing in the Program; approval of both the faculty member directing the project and the Director of the Biochemistry Program required.

Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 101 - Biological Principles I

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    An introduction to the concepts of molecular biology, the cell, energetics and genetics. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 102 - Biological Principles II

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    An introduction to the principles of evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 .
    Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 111 - Human Biology for the Non-Scientist

    Three Credits
    Summer

    This course will introduce non-scientists to the basic building blocks of life, the concepts important to understanding Biology, the Scientific Method, and the parts and functions of the organ systems of the human body. An “owner’s manual” to help students understand popular science news as it relates to their bodies.

    Prerequisite(s): Not open to Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Environmental Studies, Neuroscience, Physics, or Interdisciplinary Health Science majors.
    Fulfills the general education Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 200 - Topics in Biology

    Three Credits
    Not Offered 2014-2015

    This course utilizes primary literature to examine biological topics. The objective is to facilitate student learning by combining critical reading of the primary literature with discussion and short lectures to provide background. Assessment will involve oral presentations, written work and tests. Course may be taken twice, if topics differ.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and  .
  
  •  

    BIO 203 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    Introduction to the human body. Fall semester focus includes integument, skeleton, muscles, and nervous system. Spring semester focuses on circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urogenital and endocrine systems. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s):   and Junior or Senior standing
  
  •  

    BIO 204 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    Introduction to the human body. Spring semester focuses on circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urogenital and endocrine systems. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s):   and Junior or Senior standing
  
  •  

    BIO 211 - Cell Biology (WID)

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    An overview of eukaryotic cell structure and function. Topics include: mechanisms of protein processing, vesicular transport, intercellular and intracellular communication; cell cycle regulation; cell proliferation, differentiation and programmed cell death. (CORE) Four hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and BIO 102  (with a grade of C- or above - starting with the Class of 2019).
    Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Disciplines requirement for Biology and Neuroscience majors.
  
  •  

    BIO 212 - Genetics

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    Classical genetics of eukaryotes, the biochemistry of gene function, regulation of gene expression, mutation and repair, and genetics of prokaryotes and viruses. Laboratory work stresses classical and molecular genetics research techniques. (CORE) Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 , BIO 102  and  
  
  •  

    BIO 218 - Nutrition

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    An introduction to nutritional biology. Topics include: nutrients and their role in growth, development, health and disease treatment.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  or BIO 203 .
    Recommended for science majors and for students interested in nutrition-related fields.
  
  •  

    BIO 220 - Community Nutrition

    Three Credits
    Alternate Years Spring 2016, 2018

    Students will become familiar with community-based programs focused on nutrition and those in which nutrition is a component. Students will develop a practical knowledge, innovative approaches to community nutrition as well as an understanding of different nutritional needs of varying cultural and demographic populations. Through field visits, students engage in dialogue with public health experts who influence community nutrition practice.
     

    Prerequisite(s):  .
  
  •  

    BIO 290 - Scientific Methods: The Ocean

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    History of marine science. Ocean environmental factors. Diversity of organisms adapted to different marine communities. Value of marine resources. Some lab work involving microscopy and dissection. Independent visit to the New England Aquarium outside of class time required.

    Prerequisite(s): This course is not open to Biology (B.A. or B.S.) majors or minors.
    Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

     

  
  •  

    BIO 291 - Scientific Methods: Blood and Medicine

    Three Credits
    Spring Semester

    An understanding of why and how medical diagnostic tests are performed, in sickness and in “wellness.” An historical overview of such procedures is presented. Topical issues such as AIDS, cholesterol, diabetes, transfusions, and transplants are discussed.

    This course is open to all students but it will not count as a Biology, Biochemistry, or Neuroscience major course.

    Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

     

     

  
  •  

    BIO 296 - Scientific Methods: Women’s Health Issues

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    Explores the history and epidemiology of medical issues of women and disease processes. Subjects of inquiry include female cancers, heart disease, osteoporosis, AIDS, domestic violence, and other issues having direct impact upon women; particular attention is focused on scientific studies, both past and present.

    This course is open to all students but it will not count as a Biology, Biochemistry, or Neuroscience major course.

    Fulfills the Natural Scientific Inquiry requirement.

    Course may be applied to the Gender &  Sexuality Studies program.

     

  
  •  

    BIO 301 - Parasitology

    Four Credits
    Alternate Years: Spring 2017, 2019

    An exploration of parasites and their complex life-cycles. We will study a wide variety of parasites, their hosts, the vectors that carry them, and the diseases that they cause. We will emphasize human diseases and the immune responses to parasites. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 , BIO 102 .
    This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 303 - Environmental Botany

    Four Credits
    Alternate Years: Fall 2016, 2018

    Structure and function of lower and higher plants. Ecological principles. Evolutionary relationships. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and (BIO 102  or ENV 200 ).
    This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 304 - Molecular Biology

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    This course provides an in-depth coverage of advanced cell and molecular genetics topics, expanding on fundamental topics covered in   . It reviews modern molecular biology techniques with emphasis on experimental design and data analysis. It incorporates material from the textbook and from current scientific literature. The laboratory portion introduces molecular techniques like cloning, site-directed mutagenesis, and RFLP. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 ,  , BIO 212  and CHM 222 .
    This course fulfills the Molecular/Cellular requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 305 - Marine Ecosystems

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    Physical, chemical, and biological features of marine ecosystems. Ecological principles. Study of the local Massachusetts coastal region. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 , (BIO 102  or ENV 200 ) and Junior or Senior standing.
    This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 307 - Ecology

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    Structure and dynamics of populations, communities, and ecosystems. Mathematical models. Three hours of laboratory or field work per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 102 , (BIO 101  or ENV 200 ) Junior or Senior standing.
    This course fulfills the Environmental/Ecological requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 309 - Microbiology

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    A survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria. Topics include: microbial cell biology, growth, metabolism, and genetics; control of microbial growth; host-microbe interactions; and environmental microbiology. Two 75-minute laboratory periods per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101 , BIO 102 , BIO 211  and Junior and Senior standing.
    This course fulfills either the Molecular/Cellular or Organismal requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 310 - Developmental Biology

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    This course will provide students with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of animal and plant development. The course will investigate and integrate the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of development, organismal diversity in development, and the evolution of developmental processes. Topics will include genetics and gene expression, cell communication, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, axis specification, organogenesis, neural development, sex determination, morphogens, patterning, and stem cells.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211  and BIO 212  
    This course fulfills either the Molecular/Cellular or Organismal requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 311 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

    Four Credits
    Fall Semester

    System-by-system comparative study of vertebrate anatomy with emphasis on functional morphology. Integrated lecture/lab approach. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
    This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 312 - Vertebrate Physiology

    Four Credits
    Spring Semester

    Principles governing the function of excitable and contractile tissues, respiration, circulation, kidney function, and osmoregulation in vertebrates with emphasis on the maintenance of homeostasis. Three hours of laboratory per week.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
    This course fulfills the Organismal requirement.
  
  •  

    BIO 315 - Electron Microscopy Techniques

    Three Credits
    Fall Semester

    Preparation, viewing, and photography of ultrathin sections of biological materials. Preparation involves fixing, embedding, sectioning, and staining.

    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  and BIO 102 .
 

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